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.001% Club

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.001% Club

Postby sharkbarf » Fri Dec 09, 2011 11:44 am

I've picked a subject to stick to for 100 paintings, as to perrfect technical aspects fo my painting skills. Starting this project I didn't know what I'd like to improve on specifically. The general study stopic is "Realism".

I've decided to start to keep a detailed journal to help me solidify my exact goals, and to showcase my progress.

The first day, Dec. 5th, I had the idea, so I just set up and started painting, without a clue as to what I'd learn.

#1 It was clear to me as I painted that no matter what happens, I will no doubt improve. Not much happened the first day, except I was full of excitement. Actually something did happen. I totally let go. I realized I had developed a very tight, and a little too exact style. I'm always making sure my lines are straight, etc. Which doesn't allow for a very painterly style. To break the bonds I didn't even know I had self-imposed, I felt liberated. This feeling gave me even more excitemnet, for the fact that I had just commited to 100 of these. lol.

In my excitement to get started the only thing I had to paint on was the back of an already finished painting. As I applied the first few brush strokes I could feel how detrimental this would be to the process, but alas I kept on going. I remember watching a Francis Bacon documentary where he discovered he enjoyed painting the unprimed side better, and that's how he painted from then on. I didn't have such an enlightening experience, but I got the painting done. :D

One last thing to mention was that the day I started this project also for other reasons I had chosen to change my medium. I've always used Liquin, now I've switched to Linseed Stand Oil and Turpentine at a 50/50 ratio.
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Re: .001% Club

Postby sharkbarf » Fri Dec 09, 2011 11:49 am

BTW- The reason I call it the .001% Club is because I view personal growth only happens in infinitesimally small increments. To think that doing 100 paintings would make you at 100% is a bit silly and naive. Therefore I think I'll have to do at least 1,000 paintings before I've really mastered anything. A painting teacher once said your not truly practiced until you have 10,000 painting hours. This number seemed high at the time, but all he means is you've got to work hard every day for years if you want to be great.

By setting my standards high, even if I don't reach my goal, I'll have climbed higher than if my goal was only 10% of that.
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Re: .001% Club

Postby Singular » Fri Dec 09, 2011 1:05 pm

So what is your time frame for each painting, one per day? It might be tough to do if your aim is "realism". Achieving realism with oils takes time, taking in to account drying time, etc. When I painted regularly, I used a 3/2/1 ratio or Turpentine, Linseed oil, and Damar Varnish. Worked very well for me.

I look forward to seeing your progess and growth. This is very exciting.

best of luck,
Joe
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Re: .001% Club

Postby sharkbarf » Fri Dec 09, 2011 1:12 pm

I'm writing my next review/explanation for #2 now.
I've included some rough guidelines, including time.
Any tips or thoughts on what guidelines may help me?

Joe- was the ration 3:1 (three to one)? Or did you mix equal parts of each of the three mediums?
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Re: .001% Club

Postby Singular » Fri Dec 09, 2011 1:23 pm

Sorry for the confusion. 3 parts turpentine, 2 parts linseed oil, and 1 part damar varnish.
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Re: .001% Club

Postby lesliehansel » Fri Dec 09, 2011 1:35 pm

If that was a pre-stretch canvas there is a good chance there is sizer or rabbit glue on the back. That could be part of the problem you had with your first piece. I'm very interested to see your next one. I have not used damar varnish before. What is the benefit of using the 3/2/1 formula above versus Liquin?
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Re: .001% Club

Postby Singular » Fri Dec 09, 2011 1:44 pm

lesliehansel wrote:If that was a pre-stretch canvas there is a good chance there is sizer or rabbit glue on the back. That could be part of the problem you had with your first piece. I'm very interested to see your next one. I have not used damar varnish before. What is the benefit of using the 3/2/1 formula above versus Liquin?

Not sure if there is a benefit. It is just what I have used in the past and achieved nice results. I know Liquin does speed up the drying time and has many uses. However, I have never used it so canot really give an accurate comparison.
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Re: .001% Club

Postby sharkbarf » Fri Dec 09, 2011 2:39 pm

I'm not using the Darmar varnish in the medium mixture so I can't give a comparison. I will be trying to articulate the differences between my 50/50 ratio and Liquin though.

I have used Darmar varnish in the past as a final stage when the painting is completely dry. I love the effect. None of these will be varnished because they are studies.

Glad there's some interest in my project. You guys will be influential in my development. Any criticism is always welcome.
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Re: .001% Club

Postby sharkbarf » Fri Dec 09, 2011 5:15 pm

#2 Dec 6th.

I thought about the Guidelines to follow, and I've only come up with a few.

1. Paint no more than 2 hours. Stop mid-brushstroke if I have to. This does not include set up or clean up.

2. Paint things that seem difficult. By painting this I'd normally stray away from because of complexity I'll learn to imply detail without explaining every nuance.

3. Use Linseed Stand Oil. Because this is new to me, I'll give it a chance fair chance. (so far I hate it)

4. More to come...

Explanation-
I don't know why I picked this composition. I think it seemed more interesting because of the colors surrounding it (Teal curtains, and matching green painting), but due to size/time limitations I painted a smaller area. I'm sure I''ll paint the curtains later, because I narrowed down my general topic to "painting my studio". Probably because it is getting so cold outside, so I don't want to do landscapes, portraits need to be too exact, and still life's are just not enough chaos.
Anyway, analyzing it now I see what makes the composition interesting. The diagonal-mahogany-pixelated-rug combo gives a small sense of perspective, which I've been working on elsewhere. Even though it's only hinted at, it show me a glimpse of what I look forward to capturing.

Again unprimed canvas, but unprimed canvas still beats cardboard. lol. I went to the lumbar yard and had them cut up a 1/4" 4X8' piece of masonite into random little pieces so I got a variety of sizes. Totaling 38. I used white indoor acrylic house paint to prime the boards, 2 coats.

Realizing I am focusing on my art studio, the idea came to me to start designing my dream studio. I'll start another thread to show my drawings and explain the set up.

Also along with the .001% Club I've also started a reading club, so that I'm pushing myself multi-dimensionally everyday. My first book will be 50 secrets of magic craftsmanship" by S. Dali.
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Re: .001% Club

Postby sharkbarf » Fri Dec 09, 2011 6:09 pm

#3
26 1/2 cm. X 24 1/2 cm.
Dec 8th.

I had to take a day break because I have a bad wrist and it was bothering me, so I figured no need to stress it.

I'm painting under fluorescence (sigh). I know. I've already talked to my landlord about changing them.

Getting back to painting was like a addict getting a fix! I immediately had an epiphany; when mixing paint approximate where the value fits on a scale from 1 to 10 and mix the value in the appropriate spot on the palette (before I had just randomly mixed paint where ever there was room, starting a random arbitrary spots each time). This way when judging what my next color's value will be I can compare it to what's already been used. Honestly I'm surprised I've never heard about this technique. Taking this a step further I'd like to place the color AND value in the right place which would look like a Munsell grid. To do this properly I'll have to use a large glass palette, whereas right now I'm using my small wooden palette (in my french easel). This was HUGE for me.

As you can see there is still places that are white from the primer showing through. As far as value this isn't too off, but for a finished painting I'd never do this. This made me realize the importance of an under-painting, or in this case a simple light wash. I think I'll decide on the wash color for each scenario and use the color that is the most prevalent. I used to just prime my canvases with a color so that I didn't need to do a wash. This could be used in two entirely different, if not opposite ways;
1. Letting the color show through added a unintentional undertone that wouldn't normal be thought of.
2. I'd make sure that there wasn't even a tiny speck of the initial prime showing, so that I knew I'd layered enough.

Update- The style is not Realism, it's Representational.
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Please Critique!
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Re: .001% Club

Postby Singular » Fri Dec 09, 2011 7:09 pm

I like the progress so far. Also, your idea to update to representational from realism is a good move. As far as undertone goes, burnt umber works very well as a first layer. Don't add any color to it; simply use generous amounts of linseed oil to thin it and use it to create values and shapes. The thinner it is, the lighter the value will be. Draw objects with it. Since the paint will be very thin in consistency, due to the amount of linseed used, it will dry very quicky. Then begin adding small amounts of color adding more layers.

talk soon,
Joe
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Re: .001% Club

Postby sharkbarf » Sat Dec 10, 2011 6:21 pm

Joe that's excellent idea. As you'll see with my next post I tried an under-painting technique, but the one you described is what I'll try next.
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Re: .001% Club

Postby sharkbarf » Sat Dec 10, 2011 6:31 pm

Here's the crude drawing after a thin wash of red to harmonize with the focal point.

I tried to use the 50/50 medium to get the paint more fluid but it didn't work as well as I wanted. Stand oil is too viscous. I ended up just using turpentine. as the medium for the drawing.

I did this before SINGULAR'S suggestion, but am looking forward to try it tonight.
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Re: .001% Club

Postby sharkbarf » Sat Dec 10, 2011 6:34 pm

#4
Dec. 9
27 cm X 26 cm

I knew I'd learn, but I'm learning much faster than I would have expected. Faster than Neo learning Kung-fu. I really don't get it either, because I was painting everyday already. There's something different about the .001% Club. I think it's the structure. It's like a class where you teach yourself by listening to your intuition.

Here's what I learned:
1. I need a file, to smooth the edges of the boards where a little too much primer clumped up. Like a monk sweeping a dirt floor, it's not to clean, but to charge the area with positive energy.
2. There's no time to mix with a pallet knife. I felt like too much time was wasted because I was trying not to muddy colors. For a piece this small, and quick a little mud is insignificant.
3. Don't be tempted by reefer madness. Too many times I realized I was either zoning out not painting, or over analyzing and therefor not painting.
4. Find Aquarium foam? I'm unsure of the name, or even the type of material, but I had the idea to build/scuplt a easily attachable foam material to the left side of my easel to hold my brushes. This needs to be attachable or movable because I can't always bring a little side table with me.
5. A cardboard box is to a pretzel like Representationalism is to Visionary.
6. Draw/block in the largest shapes first. A no-brainer, but somehow I spaced out. Although not devastating, the minor errors added up quickly. For a piece that wasn't a study this stage would be given much more attention.
7. When finished with the 100 studio studies my goal will be a final large painting showcasing what I learned in a glorious "Self-portrait in my studio".
8. After #50 I'll do a 10 hour study for my final project.
9. I NEED A LARGER PALLET
10. Don't be bashful about using paint. In fact get more sloppy, mix more, even waste paint if that's what it takes to learn.
11. Maximize left-hand rag efficiency. There is too much unused space between where I wipe off my brush. I need to be more systematic, use my robotic sequencing traits.
12. There is no pressure. Half way through I felt like I needed to rush because the painting wasn't far enough along. I started to stress, until I remembered this is for fun, not to show off, or give to the gallery.

WOW!
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My angel -KT-
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Re: .001% Club

Postby sharkbarf » Sat Dec 10, 2011 6:37 pm

A poor example of using the pallet as a giant scale chart.
This doesn't relay the message I explained in #3, but it's a start. After I finished painting I took this picture. Then I tried to rearrange the values so they'd be in the proper places but it was much harder than I thought. (No picture )

I'll call these PVS (Pallet Value Study) from now on.
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A way's to go.
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Re: .001% Club

Postby feremiev » Sat Dec 10, 2011 6:47 pm

Dont know if it would help you( and dont know if you already didnt read it) but i found a book really interesting, its titled drawing with the right side of the brain. After doing some of the exorcises shown there, i can see things different and my drawing skills improved a lot. maybe you find it useful.
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Re: .001% Club

Postby sharkbarf » Sat Dec 10, 2011 6:50 pm

Thanks Feremiev.
IDK if you saw but I'm reading Dali now and have a few other authors on my list. I"ll put "drawing with the right side of the brain." on the bottom of my list...I'll get to it eventually.
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Re: .001% Club

Postby sharkbarf » Sun Dec 11, 2011 3:25 am

#5
Dec 10
9:45 - 11:45 pm
13 1/2 X 18 1/2 cm

Added two more official sections for review to my painting study.

PVS - Pallet Value Study
RE - Rag efficiency

I've noticed that when wiping off my pallet knife or brush on my painting rag I don't ever use the whole thing before I let it dry, or throw it out. I want to maximize efficiency to save money/resoures and to be a better candidate for precise grunt work in the robotic-overlord-future. Hence RE.

Here's what I learned:
1. Use viewfinder or fingers in 2 "L's" to find good composition.
2. Composition is tough...Research/Study it.
3. Left the Stand Oil out over night and it wasn't dried, not even tacky.
4. Painting small is unnecessarily difficult. Try again anyway.
5. Study a compass/geometry to better approximate angles for initial drawing.
6. Forgot an under-painting...Whoops.
7. Mixing paint is like mixing cake batter. There is a certain consistency that works best.
8. Every space in my studio that is painted will be cleaned/organized first.
9. Get apron for wiping paint off (instead of using pants or rag)
10. Get antique bottles for keeping my medium mixture - Style points!
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Re: .001% Club

Postby sharkbarf » Sun Dec 11, 2011 3:32 am

PVS - Obviously much better than my first try. Notice I only used about half of the spectrum.
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Re: .001% Club

Postby sharkbarf » Sun Dec 11, 2011 3:34 am

RE - This isn't that important, I think I can master it all though.
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