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Thoughts on charcoal and pastel portrait

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Thoughts on charcoal and pastel portrait

Postby brialouise » Mon Jul 27, 2015 7:41 pm

I have a collection of works that all show bones like this...I want legitimate thoughts on everything about it! I've considered a few contests...but I wonder if it is considered to "dark" or weird...if you would want to see more, I have about 11 or 12 other pieces with different parts.
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Re: Thoughts on charcoal and pastel portrait

Postby CarlOwen » Mon Jul 27, 2015 8:21 pm

No I do not want to see more. But I do have a question. Why do you feel the need to do what I call "shock art"?
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Re: Thoughts on charcoal and pastel portrait

Postby brialouise » Mon Jul 27, 2015 8:42 pm

Well, I was taking an anatomy class at the time I started this collection, so really it was a thought of "I wonder if I can draw bones" that turned into sort of my idealistic view of being simply skin and bones. Could you tell me what makes you call it shock art? Because I do wonder if people view it as "dark" and "gory" and things like that.
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Re: Thoughts on charcoal and pastel portrait

Postby CarlOwen » Tue Jul 28, 2015 7:26 am

How old are you Brianna? Answer this question truthfully and take a look at my movie muse gallery then any of the other galleries you choose. Let me know what you think and I will tell you my definition of shock art.
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Re: Thoughts on charcoal and pastel portrait

Postby brialouise » Tue Jul 28, 2015 10:02 am

I am 18. I did look at your movie muse gallery. They are beautiful, timeless really. But, to me, they seem simplistic and straightforward. My eyes go straight to the face, and don't really move along thoughout the work. I will admit, I don't know much of painting, that's something I haven't really dabbled with, but I love the use of oil, it creates that timeless feel, and it does make the colors and contrasts pop. And adding thus in, your Molly Quinn work is my favorite, the grey hues in the back bring her hair to attention, a beautiful contrast.
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Re: Thoughts on charcoal and pastel portrait

Postby CarlOwen » Tue Jul 28, 2015 1:21 pm

Thank you for following my directions. I thought you were young. Shock art serves no other purpose than to shock the viewer's attention to look at the work. Past that it lacks visual meaning in that the viewer either cannot or has a very limited relationship either by personal experience or conceptual idealization with the work they are looking at. Once the shock value has expired, the viewer has no further interest in looking at the work and shall move on down the aisle looking at other works of art. This type of art is time and material expensive to produce for only a few seconds of interest with very limited sales potential to a very small collector audience. It is like painting nude women. While a real pleasure for the male artist, it is a waste of time simply because of the same reason for the shock art. It does not sell. Check the internet for the types of paintings that sell the most, then make your decision.

As to your critique on my muses, thank you. You are sharp. You caught exactly what I wanted the viewer to see. They are simplistic and straightforward. The reason for the multicolored/lighted background is to make the viewer look directly at the face. I want the viewer to stay captured into looking at the face and the eyes. It is stand still play with time. It slows a person down a bit. That intransigent manipulation of time caused by looking at a beautiful painting is not only inherent in art, but an absolute necessity to transform that work into a masterpiece that stands the test of time over the centuries. This type of art is 180 degrees away from shock art. That is why I wanted you to see the muses. You now own the visual references. I still have a long way to go before I am good enough for the viewer to feel they are looking at a real person. I think I got a few years left in me to be able to get at least one painting of that caliber I see in my mind. Maybe.

The critique on your work is that you need to study anatomy, proportion, perspective and how different forms and objects meld into visual relationships within a painting. You show promise, but you need to practice. It is incredibly difficult to make the human form in an abstract style while maintaining enough precision to make it recognizable as a human without it simply looking like a bad drawing. And you have recognized the value of oils. Start learning them. Lastly, then I shall stop. Producing art is about skill, technique, concept interpretation and attitude. Hope I have helped you.
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